Lindley who threw seven interceptions in six game

first_imgLindley, who threw seven interceptions in six games last season, completed 17 of 27 passes for 214 yards and two touchdowns.“I thought Ryan looked extremely sharp,” Arians told Arizona Sports 620’s Paul Calvisi. “He could have probably had a higher rating if a couple of guys would have ran the right routes. I thought he handled himself with great poise and confidence and made a great showing for himself.”The 24-year-old’s first touchdown pass of the night came on a beautiful 55-yard throw to Jaron Brown in the third quarter, which tied the score at 17.In the fourth quarter, Lindley put the Cardinals ahead for good with a 13-yard touchdown pass to veteran wideout Mike Thomas over the middle and a nice connection in the flat to rookie running back Andre Ellington for a two-point conversion.The two touchdown passes were the first two of his NFL career.Whether three-plus quarters of quality quarterbacking are enough to keep Lindley on a roster behind Carson Palmer and Drew Stanton remains to be seen. But after Thursday night’s performance, he has enough tape to potentially attract other NFL teams should he fail to make Arizona’s Week 1 roster. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impact Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retires Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and sellingcenter_img To start the 2013 regular season with two quarterbacks or three, that is the question.If you’re asking Ryan Lindley, he hopes the Arizona Cardinals choose the latter option.And outside of Arizona’s first offensive series Thursday night, the second-year quarterback was given every opportunity to make that decision an easy one for Bruce Arians and his coaching staff.Although he was going up against the Denver Broncos’ second and third-team defensive units, the former San Diego State standout ran with his chance in the Cardinals’ preseason finale. Top Stories The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelolast_img read more

Spider silk is five times stronger than steel—now scientists know why

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Now, scientists know just how these silken strands get their power: through thousands of even smaller strands that stick together to form this critter’s clingy trap.To find out how most spider silk is five times stronger than steel, scientists analyzed the silk that venomous brown recluse spiders use to create their ground webs and hold their eggs, using an atomic force microscope. They found that each strand—which is 1000 times thinner than a human hair—is actually made up of thousands of nanostrands, only 20 millionths of a millimeter in diameter, they reported last month in ACS Macro Letters. Just like a tiny cable, each silk fiber is entirely composed of parallel nanostrands, which they measured to be at least 1 micron long. That may not sound very lengthy, but on a nanoscale, it’s at least 50 times as long as these fibers are wide—and researchers believe they could stretch even further.The idea that nanofibers make up spider silk has been proposed before, but until now, there was no evidence to suggest nanostrands comprised the entire makeup of a silk fiber. The team’s secret weapon was the unique silk of the brown recluse spider, which, unlike most, is a flat ribbon as opposed to a cylindrical fiber, making it easier to examine under the lens of a powerful microscope.center_img By Courtney MiceliNov. 20, 2018 , 8:00 AM Email The new discovery builds on a finding the team made last year, which demonstrated how the brown recluse spider reinforces its main silk strands with a special looping technique (above). Equipped with a tiny sewing machine–like spinneret, the spider weaves about 20 microloops into every millimeter of silk it ejects, which strengthens their sticky spool and prevents it from collapsing.Researchers say even though the flat ribbons and looping technique are not shared by all spiders, their study of brown recluse silk may be a window to exploring the stringy fibers of other species. Such studies could pave the way for creating new materials that could be used in medicine and engineering. But synthetic spider silk has been notoriously difficult to create. In the meantime, researchers hope their work will help us unreel one of the toughest materials of the natural world.last_img read more